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Revisiting a Classic – ‘Titanic’ in 3D

Posted by on Apr 12th, 2012 and filed under Leisure. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. You can leave a response or trackback to this entry

The unsinkable ship Titanic set sail from Queenstown (now known as Cobh), Ireland on April 12, 1912 and sank at 2:20 a.m. on April 15.

The unsinkable ship Titanic set sail from Queenstown (now known as Cobh), Ireland on April 12, 1912 and sank at 2:20 a.m. on April 15.

By Charly SHELTON

“Titanic” was the most successful movie of all time until “Avatar.” Both are James Cameron films. And now “Titanic” is back in 3D for the first time on the big screen in 15 years.

“Titanic” follows the story of young lovers Jack (Leonardo DiCaprio) and Rose (Kate Winslet) when they meet and fall in love on board the maiden voyage of Titanic and how they react during the sinking of the ship. Whether you enjoy the romance between the two lovers or the historical significance or the special effects, this film appeals to almost everyone as among the greatest films of all time.

The film, originally released Christmas of 1997, grossed $1.8 billion, the highest in history to that point, only beaten by “Avatar” in 2009. After an $18 million touch up and 3D conversion process, “Titanic” is back on the big screen and raking in the dough. In its first five days, from Wednesday, April 4 to Sunday, April 8, the re-released “Titanic” took in just over $25 million. It is a 15-year-old movie, available on DVD and VHS, and yet it still makes money. Amazing.

The only problems that this reporter can find lie in the inherent issues with the conversion process. In order to take a 2D film to 3D, the edges of the frame have been moved to suit each eye. This results in ghosting images at the far end of the frame (where one eye sees something that the other doesn’t). This may not affect most of today’s directors, but for Cameron, who really knows frame composition and makes each frame look like a postcard shot, this cuts into his frame. The audience is not only aware of the ghosting, but it actually hinders things that we need to see. However, for a 15-year-old movie about a sinking ship, it still looks better than most of the movies made since then. The effects are amazing – both digital and practical – and they stand up to today’s standards.

The set of “Titanic” the movie with actors in front of a green screen. The little boy, in the hat and uncomfortable shoes, is reporter Charly Shelton.

The set of “Titanic” the movie with actors in front of a green screen. The little boy, in the hat and uncomfortable shoes, is reporter Charly Shelton.

My father Mark Shelton worked on the film and had some of the best effects sequences in the film; both he and I were used as extras in a shot. At 7 years old, I got to be an extra in the scene of the port that “Titanic” set out of. Understandably, this film holds a very special place in my heart, and I’m sure it does for many others, too. It is one of those movies that speaks to everyone. And back on the big screen, this is the perfect time to show it to new viewers, to see it how it’s meant to be seen.

Rated PG-13, I give this film 5 out of 5 stars.

 

The set of “Titanic” the movie with actors in front of a green screen. The little boy, in the hat and uncomfortable shoes, is reporter Charly Shelton.

 

 

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